HOT AND COLD SALT WATER SPA

The Hot and Cold Salt Water Spa is an equine therapy spa that has been designed and engineered to assist in the treatment and prevention of lower leg injuries and disease. The Spa utilizes both hot and cold water as therapy. The water is circulated through jets of air that create a massaging effect. 

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COLD WATER THERAPY

The cold water triggers and reduces the amount of fluid that accumulates in an injured area. The cold water temperature reduces swelling, numbs pain and slows down the degeneration of damaged tissues, encouraging the body’s natural healing processes to operate more efficiently. The water is pumped with jets of air, which have a massaging effect that stimulates tissues and relaxes the horse. Aeration of the water at low temperature also significantly increases the concentration of oxygen, which speeds the healing process. Cold water increases arterial blood flow to the chilled area and an increase in venous flow returning blood to the heart and lungs. The cold water significantly increases blood flow to the injured area and speeds healing. Cold water reduces the amount of accumulating fluid in an injured area.

HOT WATER THERAPY

Hot water therapy is used once swelling and inflammation have been reduced.Hot water causes blood vessels to dilate, increasing blood flow to the site. As capillaries open up, they allow more oxygen and nutrients to reach the injured cells, supporting the growth of new, healthy tissue. The increased blood flow created by hot water helps remove excess fluids out of the injured area. Hot water increases blood flow and circulation. Increasing blood flow promotes healing by increasing the amount of oxygen in the area. Hot water therapy is generally the 2nd phase of therapy used after an injury. 

CASES THAT BENEFIT FROM HOT AND COLD SALT WATER SPA THERAPY:

  • Laminitis
  • Tendon Injuries
    • Injury to Superficial Digital Flexor
    • Check ligament
    • Deep digital flexor
  • Suspensory strain or tear
  • Arthritis
  • Fetlock or pastern injuries
  • Kneed or hock injuries
  • Coffin joint injuries
  • Hoof injuries
  • Abscesses
  • Stone Bruise
  • Founder